AUV deployment south of Svalbard

Peter Wadhams (CPC) and his team have successfully completed their field trip to deploy an AUV, to measure ice thickness, south of Svalbard.  With agreement from Aleksey Marchenko (UNIS), the team were able to utilise the MV Polarsyssel in order to carry out the fieldwork. The Stand-alone USBL Positioning Buoy, developed by Bo Krogh (UNIS),… Read more »

Read Full »

IMG_3119

More fieldwork in Greenland

Steffen Olsen (DMI) has just returned from another successful deployment of instruments in Qannaaq in North-West Greenland.   He’s also deployed Martin Doble’s (Polar Scientific) Aquascat mooring successfully. This work was in collaboration with local Inuit hunters Rasmus Avike and Lars Jeremiassen, who were engaged in all components of the field programme.  

Read Full »

WB023 sunset

BLOG: Buoy deployments in the Arctic on board the Korean icebreaker RV Araon

RV Araon Blog ICE-ARC PI Jeremy Wilkinson (British Antarctic Survey) is currently on board a cruise operating by the Korean Polar Research Institute (KOPRI) on the Korean ice breaker RV Araon. During the cruise from Nome, Alaska to the Chukchi Sea a number or autonomous instruments will be deployed, the instruments are designed capture and communicate direct measurements… Read more »

Read Full »

Life on the front line of climate change

Horizon, the EU Research and Innovation Magazine, features an article about the ICE-ARC project. The article describes the work that ICE-ARC researchers are carrying out with local communities in north west Greenland to examine the impact of sea ice changes on the lives of people living in the Arctic. Read the full article here .

Read Full »

SATICE 2

SATICE Buoy Deployments

ICE-ARC partner CSIC are deploying a series of SATICE buoys. SATICE, is the first high-rate, high-precision positioning experiment on sea ice in the Arctic Ocean. It consists of an array of five polar GPS buoys operating simultaneously. Each buoy collects continuous GPS data while drifting on sea ice. Data from each buoy is streamed over… Read more »

Read Full »

Igor photo1

Thawing permafrost and freshwater drive Arctic Ocean acidification

Acidification off the coast of Northern Siberia in the Arctic Ocean is caused by increased thawing permafrost and freshwater discharge. Importantly, acidity levels of the region are much higher than previously predicted, according to a new study published in journal Nature Geoscience. The study, carried out by researchers Igor Semiletov, Natalia Shakhova and colleagues, was… Read more »

Read Full »

EMsled first results sled run

Field work blog from NW Greenland day 6

EMsled blog no. 4 ICE-ARC PI Jeremy Wilkinson and Francois Guerraz from the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) are working with colleagues from the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) and the Greenland Climate Research Centre (GCRC) and local Inuit in North West Greenland. They’re developing an instrument that will eventually be given to hunters to put on their… Read more »

Read Full »

IMG_2744

Field work blog from NW Greenland day 4

EMsled blog no. 3 ICE-ARC PI Jeremy Wilkinson and Francois Guerraz from the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) are working with colleagues from the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) and the Greenland Climate Research Centre (GCRC) and local Inuit in North West Greenland. They’re developing an instrument that will eventually be given to hunters to put on their… Read more »

Read Full »

DSC_1307

Field work blog from NW Greenland day 1

EMsled blog no. 2 ICE-ARC PI Jeremy Wilkinson and Francois Guerraz from the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) are working with colleagues from the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) and the Greenland Climate Research Centre (GCRC) and local Inuit in North West Greenland. They’re developing an instrument that will eventually be given to hunters to put on their… Read more »

Read Full »

Field work blog from NW Greenland

EMsled blog no. 1 ICE-ARC PI Jeremy Wilkinson and Francois Guerraz from the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) are working with colleagues from the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) and the Greenland Climate Research Centre (GCRC) and local Inuit in North West Greenland. They’re developing an instrument that will eventually be given to hunters to put on their… Read more »

Read Full »